Gwulo: Old Hong Kong

Welcome

Welcome to Gwulo.com, and over 30,000 pages about old Hong Kong.

If it's your first visit, you might like to use the search box at the top of the page to find what you're looking for, check out the latest old photos, or just scroll down to browse through recent articles.

I hope you'll join in too, and share your questions and knowledge with us. Most pages let you leave a comment, it's easy to upload a photo, and the Forum is waiting for you to post a new message.

Finally, if you're interested in Hong Kong history, please stay in touch by signing up for Gwulo's free weekly newsletter.

Kind regards,

David

PS 'Gwu lo' is roughly how '古老' sounds in Cantonese. It means 'ancient' or 'old-fashioned'.

New on Gwulo: 2020, week 42

I've listed some of the recent highlights below, but you can visit the What's New page at any time to see all the latest additions to the site.

 

General

 


 

Book news

Thanks to Annemarie Evans for inviting me on to her radio show last weekend, for a chat about some of my favourite photos in the recently published book, Crime, Justice and Punishment in Colonial Hong Kong. The episode of Hong Kong Heritage is now available to listen to online, with our conversation starting at 9 minutes 54 seconds.

Meanwhile, the new Gwulo new book has reached the home stretch. On Friday we finalised the layout for the book's cover and the dreaded map - something I always put off until it can't be put off any more...

That means the layout is almost finished. We've still got ten days to go until it heads off to the printer, so this week will be spent making final tweaks to the photos, and editing the text to incorporate feedback from the people who've kindly read the draft.

Here's how those final layout items look - please let me know if you spot any mistakes!

1930s "Carring firewoods"

1930s "Carring firewoods"

 

What: As the postcard's misspelled title says, we're looking at firewood.

Bundles of firewood

 

This was destined for Hong Kong's kitchens, as most people in 1930s Hong Kong cooked over a wood fire. A 1938 newspaper article said that firewood was the principal fuel for over

New on Gwulo: 2020, week 40

I've listed some of the recent highlights below, but you can visit the What's New page at any time to see all the latest additions to the site.

 

General

 


 

Places

1930s San Wai Camp

1930s San Wai Camp

 

Where: The back of this photo has a note that says we're looking at a training camp, but doesn't tell us anything more about its location.

Back of photo A413

 

Fortunately, IDJ has previously uploaded a similar view that tells us where it was taken.

New on Gwulo: 2020, week 38

I've listed some of the recent highlights below, but you can visit the What's New page at any time to see all the latest additions to the site.

 

General

 


 

Talk on 5 October, and other book news

On Monday evening, 5 October, I'll join May Holdsworth and Christopher Munn in the JC Cube theatre at Tai Kwun to give a joint talk about the recently published book, Crime, Justice and Punishment in Colonial Hong Kong. (The book will be on sale at the event with a special 30% discount.)

May and Christopher will share some of the colourful characters and other discoveries that they encountered during their detailed research for this project. I'll follow up by showing a selection of my favourite images from the book, focusing on several that surprised me. After the talk there is plenty of time for Q&A.

I'm looking forward to hearing what May and Christopher have to say, and also to showing you the images - JC Cube has tiered seating and an enormous screen that make it a great venue for showing off high resolution images.

Please visit the Tai Kwun website for more details and to book your seats.

Front cover

 

The first reviews of the new book are also starting to appear.

South China Morning Post:

Written in an approachable style, the book is full of historical data, personalities and anecdotes that illuminate [Tai Kwun’s] history... At once informative and entertaining, it brings both Hong Kong’s judicial system and its early history to vivid life.

 

Asian Review of Books:

Anyone with a passing interest in the city and its colonial past will find something to enjoy in this book. For readers who know Hong Kong well, it might even help to

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