Luk Hoi Tung Hotel [????-????] | Gwulo: Old Hong Kong

Luk Hoi Tung Hotel [????-????]

Current condition: 
Demolished / No longer exists

This hotel was one of the places used to hold internees before they were moved to Stanley Camp in Jan 1942.

The position is approximate, based on this address from the 1948 Telephone Directory:

Luk Hoi Tung Hotel, gr. floor, 147/150 Connaught Rd. C. 23876 „ 1st floor 20083

However it may have moved, so I'm not 100% sure the marker shows the location of the hotel in 1941/2.

Moddsey found another clue:

R. MacKenzie, then CIP in 1964 in this issue of the Police Magazine recounts

" I was put up into a 'palatial place' called the Luk Hoi Tong with about 150 of my fellow officers. The two-storey Luk Hoi Tong was situated near to Connaught Road Central and the Sincere Company premises. I shared a room with four others, two to a bed, no exercise and never ending supplies of half-cooked chicken feet and a cacophony of sound from the rats running across the wire mesh above our beds.

On 22 January 1942, we left this 'hotel' and were marched to Sam Kok Ma Tau (Triangular Pier) where we all boarded an enormous junk and were towed by a launch via Green Island and Aberdeen to Stanley."

If anyone can confirm its location in 1941/2, please let us know.

Regards, David

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From http://battleforhongkong.blogspot.com/2013/ :

"In early January [1941] most of the British, American and Dutch civilians were herded into cheap and squalid hotels in the Western District close to the waterfront. Many of these had been used as brothels. The internees were crowded into small cubicles, often sharing with complete strangers and with no segregation between men and women. Harold and his police colleagues were taken on 6th January 1942 from the Gloucester Hotel to the Luk Hoi Tung Hotel. Police Officer George Wright-Nooth in his book entitled "Prisoner of the Turnip Heads" describes the place of their initial incarceration:

"The Luk Hoi Tong was a seedy, fourth-rate establishment near the waterfront catering for travelling traders or seamen. It was one of many similar hotels in the area which were the hangouts of pimps and prostitutes. About 250 of us were packed into its forty-odd rooms (meant for two each). Once everybody had been pushed in, the iron grill door at its dingy entrance was slammed shut and locked. A solitary sentry sat on a stool outside.

Food, together with extreme boredom coupled with lack of exercise, was our main pre-occupation. Two meals a day of a bowl of rice with a few chicken's feet or three or four lumps of rotten meat was all we got. In the coming months, we were to look back on the size of these meals with hungry relish.""

I'm wondering if the hotel was owned by the Luk Hoi Tong (LHT Tower and the former Queen's Theatre on the same site, Luk Kwok Hotel, Nathan Hotel, Dragon Inn) that still exists today. Many of their properties date from the '20s and '30s.