69G, Robinson Road [????- ] | Gwulo: Old Hong Kong

69G, Robinson Road [????- ]

Current condition: 
In use

This is a curious building on the south / uphill side of Robinson Road, opposite Castle Steps. Here's how it looks from the west:

69G Robinson Road

It looks as though it was originally planned to be symmetrical about the staircase.

Here's the view of the wall at the other end:

69G Robinson Road

The stubs of the concrete joists add to the feeling there's a missing half to this building.

That's not so unusual in Hong Kong. Often a section of a building is re-developed, leaving part of the older building still standing.

But look at the building that stands where the other half of 69G should be:

69G & F, Robinson Road
69F & G Robinson Road

That's 69F, an odd little building that looks older than 69G.

I guess that the west half of 69G was built with the plan to build the east half when 69F was demolished. But the owners of 69F decided to keep it, so 69G was never completed.

I'd be interested to hear if anyone knows any more information about these two buildings, eg their ages, and whether there has ever been an eastern half to 69G.

Regards, David

Photos that show this place

Comments

Hi David,

A real estate page says this buidling was built in 1945.

http://default.centadata.com/pih09/pih09/estate.aspx?type=1&code=TZILZHX...

Hi,

I guess it's a bit older. Whenever we see 01-1945 as the Date of occupation on Centadata, I read it as "Pre-war building, records lost during the war".

Regards, David

These two buildings are owned by the Cheung's family, as there is a chinese character 「張」engraved on the number plate of 69F. They are believed to be built before 1939, as I just found that there were three old girls of the St. Stevens' Girls' college reported their address as 69 Robinson Road (https://www.hkmemory.hk/.../P020131028627688385083.pdf P.20 ). One of the family members of the Cheungs'  was a KMT General (according to some Chinese news report) and one of the Cheungs married to the son of Fu Tak Lam (aka 傳老榕)