Elsie Susan GLENDINNING (née HILLIER) [c.1896-????] | Gwulo: Old Hong Kong

Elsie Susan GLENDINNING (née HILLIER) [c.1896-????]

Names
Given: 
Elsie Susan
Family: 
Glendinning
Maiden: 
Hillier
Sex: 
Female
Status: 
Deceased
Birth
Date: 
c.1896-01-01 (Year, Month, Day are approximate)
Birthplace (town, state): 
Granville, New South Wales
Birthplace (country): 

Married Percy Glendinning on 14 October 1919 at St John's Cathedral Hong Kong.

Connections: 

Comments

"The wedding of Mr. G. Glendinning to Miss E. Hillier en route from Australia will shortly take place" 

Source: The China Mail, page 4, 12th September 1919

Australia Birth Register

Elsie S Hillier daughter of John Hillier and Effie birth registered Granville New South Wales 1896

Did she marry Mr G Glendinning or Percy Richard Glendinning?

She married Percy Glendinning. I can only surmise the China Mail of 12th September 1919 had a typo error. 

Source: Hong Kong Daily Press, page 3, 15th October 1919

 

"HONGKONG WEDDING.

               ---------------------

GLENDINNING-HILLIER.

 

At St. John’s Cathedral, yesterday afternoon, Mr. Percy Glendinning, chief inspector of the Hongkong Tramway Company, was married to Miss Elsie Susan Hillier, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Hillier, of Auburn, N.S.W., who arrived in the Colony on Monday by the s.s. St. Albans.

 

The bride motored to the Cathedral in the company or Mr. Walter Glendinning, who gave her away. Her dress was of ivory crèpe de chine, trimmed with pearls and georgette love knots, and she wore a beautifully embroidered veil over a Dutch cap of an uncommon and tasteful design. Her bridesmaids were the little Misses Patricia and Aileen Hynes, daughters of Mr. Thomas Hynes, Superintendent of Mails, G.P.O., and Mrs. Hynes. Their frocks were of pale pink palace crèpe, prettily trimmed with georgette and pearls. Their picture hats were trimmed with pale pink and saxe blue, and they carried baskets of pink roses. Mr. Charles Poole acted as “best man.”

 

The Rev. V.H. Copley Moyle performed the marriage ceremony. When the register was signed, Mr. J.W. White, at the organ, played Mendelssohn’s “Wedding March.” After this, the newly-married couple and the guests repaired to the residence of Mr. Walter Glendinning, the bridegroom’s brother, where a reception was held.

 

Mr. T. Hynes, in proposing the health of the newly married couple, said the bride had come from the land which produced nuggets and other precious things and he had no doubt that, in the days to come, the bridegroom would find that he had obtained a very precious thing indeed in his Australian bride. He wished them all the prosperity and good-luck possible and hoped that their married life might be long and happy.

 

After a very convivial time, the bride and bridegroom left for Macao and Canton for their honeymoon. They were the recipients of a number of presents. The bridegroom gave the bride a handsome pendant set with pearls, and the bride presented the bridegroom with a gold nugget tie-pin. The bridegroom gave each of the bridesmaids a gold brooch set with a ruby.”